Text Box: Text Box: RUNNING BACKS
Running backs have two "rating" numbers for Short Yardage and Breakaway rushing. These numbers are mostly independent of each other. A high number for short yardage means the runner is almost impossible to stop within the first two yards of the line of scrimmage. Each runner regardless of their short number has a fixed number of play results that read (guessing here) "Breakaway" meaning the runner has cleared the first two yards past the line of scrimmage. The higher the Breakaway rating, the greater the chance for a long gain. The two values combine to form the RBs overall YPC average.There are two additional ratings for RBs. The first is "Wrk" which only appears for high volume per game RBs. This stands for "Workhorse." If any defense play is called that is NOT "run" then the Wrk rating adds that amount to the RBs YPC average. Zeke Elliott is a 3.8 YPC runner, but that elevates to 4.0 vs basic or pass defense call because of his 0.2 Wrk rating. The rating still applies when keyed, unless a run defense is called.The other rating is "Key" which is fairly straightforward. That number is the amount that the runners YPC is reduced when keyed correctly. (edited)  Running backs have two "rating" numbers for Short Yardage and Breakaway rushing. These numbers are mostly independent of each other. A high number for short yardage means the runner is almost impossible to stop within the first two yards of the line of scrimmage. Each runner regardless of their short number has a fixed number of play results that read (guessing here) "Breakaway" meaning the runner has cleared the first two yards past the line of scrimmage. The higher the Breakaway rating, the greater the chance for a long gain. The two values combine to form the RBs overall YPC average.There are two additional ratings for RBs. The first is "Wrk" which only appears for high volume per game RBs. This stands for "Workhorse." If any defense play is called that is NOT "run" then the Wrk rating adds that amount to the RBs YPC average. Zeke Elliott is a 3.8 YPC runner, but that elevates to 4.0 vs basic or pass defense call because of his 0.2 Wrk rating. The rating still applies when keyed, unless a run defense is called.The other rating is "Key" which is fairly straightforward. That number is the amount that the runners YPC is reduced when keyed correctly. 
Text Box: Blitzing a LB does not affect his run defense or pass defense other than possibly taking hiIf you run blitz ---When using a DE-LB rated player at DE, the pass defense portion of the player's rating is set to 0 and not counted by the game.
---When splitting a TE wide, his block rating changes to 1/0 regardless of his shown block rating, but his receiving numbers are increased.
---When splitting a RB wide, his "short" run rating is changed to 1, in case you want to try a sneaky end-around or jet sweep from the wide set position.
---The pass block rating for TE/HB/RB is counted as 0, unless the player is deliberately kept in to block on the play.
---A LB-S rated player will alert as "out of position" when used at OLB, but the rating does not take a hit and is the same as ILB. The alert is an error in the DK game
---If you want to know how a player will be rated when out of position, open the player page and select the "RATINGS" tab at the top right of the display box  - call a run defense while blitzing a LB or DB - if the blitzer comes from the same side as the RB carries the ball then you have a much higher chance of a stuff and a fumble. If you blitz from the wrong side, the advantage goes to the runner in the way of increased short gain and greatly increased breakaway yardage m out of the play. When guys blitz a bunch a number starts to show up in the blitz box. That's a warning that he's nearing his limit. When the number also has a !, it means he's gassed as a blitzer and his pass rush is much less effective. When you blitz a LB, that player's rating is removed from pass coverage and also removed from run defense if you are blitzing from the wrong side But the QB is still affected by the blitzer in terms of pressure results 
Text Box: ---When using a DE-LB rated player at DE, the pass defense portion of the player's rating is set to 0 and not counted by the game.
---When splitting a TE wide, his block rating changes to 1/0 regardless of his shown block rating, but his receiving numbers are increased.
---When splitting a RB wide, his "short" run rating is changed to 1, in case you want to try a sneaky end-around or jet sweep from the wide set position.
---The pass block rating for TE/HB/RB is counted as 0, unless the player is deliberately kept in to block on the play.
---A LB-S rated player will alert as "out of position" when used at OLB, but the rating does not take a hit and is the same as ILB. The alert is an error in the DK game
---If you want to know how a player will be rated when out of position, open the player page and select the "RATINGS" tab at the top right of the display box.  
Text Box: DRAW PLAY and SCREEN PASS
A DRAW play is a run designed to defeat a run defense. A SCREEN pass is a pass play designed to defeat a pass defense. Think of it in football logic. A draw is a middle run with a slight delay. A draw is the opposite of play action - you are trying to sell a pass play then running the ball. If the defense is playing run, the LBs and DL are all moving toward the line of scrimmage and trying to plug gaps. The OL has only one job, make one small hole in the A gap. If they succeed and the RB hits that hole, the only thing to stop him is the free safety and maybe a smart MLB. With the screen pass, again think of football logic. When a pass defense is called, the linebackers have their back to the line of scrimmage or are in man coverage. The safeties are deep and the CBs are flying down the sidelines covering their guys. The only people to stop a screen are the DL. If the RB can get behind the DL, the odds of a nice gain are there because the second level of defenders are all moving away from the line. 
Text Box: On the defense screen you will see two "windowshades" (given that name because they roll down) for "AVG PASS" and "AVG RUN."  When you unroll them you see different choices for play types. You can select your defense to focus on a specific play at any time and change it at will.  The actual numbers of benefit are a bit of a mystery, but I've studied them at length and can make a guess.  When you choose a specific play to defend, those plays are reduced by approximately 3.5% - both in success rate and results. But all other plays are increased in results and success rate by 2.5-3%.  So it's the typical risk/reward. The way to use this setup is if you have a coach who is in love with medium passes, you can effectively turn Josh Allen into Baker Mayfield as a passer by dropping his comp% by 3.5%. But let's say the offense gets wise and starts throwing short passes. You can still call tight defense while locking in on medium passes. It's sort of a "bend don't break" defense with smaller advantages over two different zones. Think of each depth/play focus as a mini "key" on that area of the field. On the offense screen I've highlighted the ZONE SEAM and ISOLATE MAN play calls. These are pass plays where you do not get to choose play depth - but they are always a short pass. The receiver's YAC rating (yards after catch) is pretty much ignored but the receiver rating is not. If you call "Isolate Man" and the defense calls any man defense, that short pass play is increased in success rate by approximately 15-20%. So your normal 70% success rate on a short pass is bumped to somewhere around 85-90%. If the defense calls a zone defense, then your success rate goes the other direction by 15-20%. These plays will rarely go for more that 10-12
COACHING POINTS

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